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Professor Mark Scott

Professor

Mark Scott

Professor
School of Architecture, Planning and Environmental Policy
01 716 2789
University College Dublin, School of Architecture Planning and Environmental Policy, Planning and Env Policy Belfield Dublin 4

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Mark’s research is focused on theories and practices of land-use and landscape planning and governance. Specifically, his current research is focused on three themes. Firstly, Mark has a longstanding research interest in planning and the rural environment. This includes research and publications relating to rural housing conflicts and residential mobilities, rural resilience, and contested landscape and rural land-use change. Mark is currently exploring new directions for rural planning theory and practice. He recently co-edited 'Rural Planning & Development' with Nick Gallent (Routledge, 2017) and has recently completed the 'Routledge Companion to Rural Planning' (with Nick Gallent and Menelaos Gkartzios), due for publication in 2018. Secondly, Mark’s research explores green infrastructure, urban green space and sustainable cities. This research examines the integration of ecosystem approaches with spatial planning as a means of sustainably managing land-use. This research is based on a series of EPA research funded projects (with Mick Lennon), which have explored green infrastructure and biodiversity, climate change adaptation and urban green space and health (co-funded with the HSE). Much of this research also involves developing and applying novel approaches to stakeholder and citizen engagement for environmental planning and design. This research extends Mark’s ongoing interest in sustainable cities and quality of life, particularly at a neighbourhood level. Thirdly, Mark is currently undertaking research related to heritage landscapes in urban and rural contexts. This includes a recent comparative study of historic urban landscapes involving researchers in Newcastle University, TU Delft, IAV Venice, and NTNU (funded by Joint Programme Initiative for Cultural Heritage) and research relating to the representation of heritage in local place-making (with Arthur Parkinson and Declan Redmond).