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Dr Paul Perry

Dr

Paul Perry

Lecturer/Assistant Professor
School of English, Drama and Film
01 716 7777
University College Dublin, School of English Drama and Film, Newman Building Belfield Dublin 4

TEACHING INTERESTS

Evolving pedagogic approaches to Creative Writing (CW) is something I have been passionately involved with as a teacher, facilitator, thinker and writer for several years now. At UCD my teaching and learning methods are informed by a number of factors, not least my own practice as a working writer. I share my experience as a practising writer with the students: as published poet, novelist, screenwriter, reviewer, critic and essayist. I invite the students to participate and take ownership of their own work and their own development as writers with informed guidance and mentorship. In this sense, I hope to foster and contribute to a community of practice at UCD, and to the creative and generative environment of critical and creative writing in the Humanities. My approaches are student-centred – the cap we maintain of 12 students per workshop at UCD’s CW programme allows us to meet best international practice. Students share work prior to class, and come ready to peer-review, and as workshop leader, I lend an expert steer and prepared, annotated textual feedback to their work which is open for discussion. Often, we will ‘flip’ the classroom and carry out in-class activities, and explore new possibilities of reading a poem, and of composing one. I have recently edited an anthology of essays on the subject of teaching and learning approaches to CW entitled Beyond the Workshop, Kingston University Press (2015), where I invited leading experts in the field of CW studies to contest traditional models of knowledge transfer, and interrogate the working models of CW theory and practice. This has fed my interest in pedagogy and psychology and has meant that I have developed a number of writing assignments which strive to challenge the student’s presuppositions of self, agency and learning in the classroom. One has proven highly successful. I call it Radical Empathy - where students pair off and simply listen to one another for a ten-minute period without interruption and compose a poem on the notes they have made while actively listening. I cannot over-emphasise the sense of ‘break-through’ students experience when they are empowered to write by relinquishing their own assertions, and by listening attentively, and deeply. Emphasis is placed on process rather than product – and as a community we learn to learn together. In other words, the pedagogic shift is placed on participation and active learning. I am delighted to see that as we introduce a CW UG pathway that many creative elements to EL courses have already been embedded within modules, and I have since offered to lead a workshop for colleagues who are non-creative writers and how they can assess CW elements in their modules.

TEACHING ACTIVITIES

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COURSE DEVELOPED
Literary Editing / HCE
7 Sep 2020
GRADUATE EXAMINATION
Narrative / David Mitchell
9 Sep 2019
Examination committee member
MODULE COORDINATED
2019
MODULE COORDINATED
2019
MODULE COORDINATED
2019
MODULE COORDINATED
2019
MODULE COORDINATED
2019
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